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VOLUME 1 NO. 3 , 2017

OTHER ONLINE ARTICLES

Famdent Event

Famdent Event

Event

Famdent house as alwayshad yet another successful show. The show furnished three day scientificseminars and workshops with India’s top speakers and international speakersalong with widespread exhibition of 300 plus dental traders showcasing theirlatest products and projects adding value to the dental education anddevelopment of the dental fraternity.

Product Review

Restoring with Flowables

Restoring with Flowables

Product

This book isenriched with the concepts of next-generation flowable composites and presentseach of them in step-by-step fashion including 5 videos. The insightful sharingof adhesivedesign concept and use of right materials will aid dental practitioners in providingsuperior treatment to their patients. 

A Critical Review of Search Strategies Used in Recent Systematic Reviews Published in Selected Prosthodontic and Implant-Related Journals: Are Systematic Reviews Actually Systematic?
Danielle Layton

A Critical Review of Search Strategies Used in Recent Systematic Reviews Published in Selected Prosthodontic and Implant-Related Journals: Are Systematic Reviews Actually Systematic?

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to outline how search strategies can be systematic, to examine how the searches in recent systematic reviews in prosthodontic and implant-related journals were structured, and to determine whether the search strategies used in those articles were systematic.
Materials and Methods: A total of 103 articles published as systematic reviews and indexed in Medline between January 2013 and May 2016 were identified from eight prosthodontic and implant journals and reviewed. The search strategies were considered systematic when they met the following criteria: (1) more than one electronic database was searched, (2) more than one searcher was clearly involved, (3) both text words and indexing terms were clearly included in the search strategy, (4) a hand search of selected journals or reference lists was undertaken, (5) gray research was specifically sought, and (6) the articles were published in English and at least one other language. The data were tallied and qualitatively assessed. 
Results: The majority of articles reported on implants (54%), followed by toothsupported fixed prosthodontics (13%). A total of 23 different electronic resources were consulted, including Medline (by 100% of articles), the Cochrane Library (52%), and Embase (37%). The majority consulted more than one electronic resource (71%), clearly included more than one searcher (73%), and employed a hand search of either selected journals or reference lists (86%). Less than half used both text words and indexing terms to identify articles (42%), while 15% actively sought gray research. Articles published in languages other than English were considered in 63 reviews, but only 14 had no language restrictions. Of the 103 articles, 5 completed search strategies that met all 6 criteria, and a further 12 met 5 criteria. Two articles did not fulfill any of the criteria. 
Conclusion: More than 95% of recent prosthodontic and implant review articles published in the selected journals failed to use search strategies that were systematic, and this undermines the conclusions. Many resources are available to help investigators design search strategies for systematic reviews that minimize the risk of omitting important data, including the simple criteria presented in this paper.

ONLINE FIRST

Association between the central papilla and embrasure crown morphology in different gingival biotypes – a cross-sectional study
Abhay Kolte, Rajashri Kolte, Girish Bodhare

Association between the central papilla and embrasure crown morphology in different gingival biotypes – a cross-sectional study

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The presence of an interproximal gingival (central) papilla is of primeimportance and an essential component of a harmonious and pleasing smile. Theaim of this study was to determine the association between the presence of acentral papilla and embrasure and crown morphology. Methods: The studywas conducted on 200 periodontally healthy patients. Parameters such a centralpapilla presence, gingival thickness, crown length, crown width, contactsurface, radiographic assessment of bone crest to contact point (BC-CP), andinterdental width (IDW) in maxillary central incisor embrasure morphology wererecorded. Results: A statistically strong significance (P = 0.001) wasfound for the presence of a central papilla, which was 100% in squarish crownmorphology and reduced for tapered squarish and triangular crown forms. Agingival biotype with a thickness of 1.5 to 2.0 mm exhibited a central papillapresence of 88.46%. All the interdental variables were significantly related tothe presence of a central papilla, with BC-CP distance and IDW demonstrating ahigh significance (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: In relation to themaxillary central incisors, the crown and embrasure morphologies have a stronginfluence over the presence of a central papilla.
Solubility, bond strength and sealing ability of Biodentine as a retrograde filling
Ahmed Hussein AbuElEzz, Ahmed Mostafa Ghobashy, Salma Hassan ElAshry

Solubility, bond strength and sealing ability of Biodentine as a retrograde filling

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Background: This study aimed to evaluateBiodentine as a retrograde filling in terms of solubility, bond strength to theroot canal dentine, and sealing ability. Biodentine was compared with mineral trioxideaggregate (MTA) as a control material. Materials and methods: For thesolubility test, samples of 10 mm diameter and 1.5 mm thickness were preparedin Teflon moulds. After setting, specimens were weighed and placed in distilledwater and then reweighed after one and three weeks. For bond strength andsealing ability, a total of 32 trimmed roots of 16 mm length from single rootedteeth were used. Roots were prepared with ProTaper Universal instruments. Theywere obturated using System B and Obtura. Apical 3 mm roots were cut off andretrograde cavities were prepared (3 mm depth and 0.8 mm diameter) and filled witheither Biodentine or MTA. Samples were embedded in acrylic blocks and ahorizontal section of 2 mm thickness was cut off. Bond strength of eachmaterial was measured immediately, and after one and three weeks while placedin saline solution. For sealing ability, fluid filtration test was used. Thecoronal parts of the roots were embedded in glass ionomer cement except fortheir apical 3 mm. Results: After 3 weeks‘ immersion, the solubility ofBiodentine was significantly higher compared with MTA. For bond strength,Biodentine showed higher immediate bond strength than MTA; however, after threeweeks, the difference was significant in favour of MTA. For sealing ability,Biodentine showed better leakage resistance at zero time, however thedifference was statistically insignificant after one and three weeks. Conclusion:Based on the assessment of different physioco-chemical properties Biodentineseems to be an alternative to MTA when used as root end filling material.

 

Keywords: Biodentine,bond strength, fluid filtration, leakage, MTA, push-out, solubility
Survival Rates and Bone and Soft Tissue Level Changes Around One-Piece Dental Implants Placed with a Flapless or Flap Protocol: 8.5-Year Results
Stuart J. Froum, Ismael Khouly

Survival Rates and Bone and Soft Tissue Level Changes Around One-Piece Dental Implants Placed with a Flapless or Flap Protocol: 8.5-Year Results

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The purpose of the current study was to determine thesurvival rates and to measure marginal bone changes and peri-implant conditions8.5 years after placement of one-piece implants with an anodically oxidizedsurface (AOS). A total of 52 subjects who received a one-piece implant with anAOS using a flapless or flap protocol and completed a previous randomizedclinical trial were contacted for a recall visit 8.5 years after implantplacement (T8.5). Implant success and survival rates, probing pocket depth(PPD), presence of bleeding on probing (BoP), papilla level, and incidence ofcomplications and peri-implant disease were assessed by a single, blindedexaminer. A second blinded examiner evaluated marginal bone level changes.Results for 8.5 years were compared to those at the time of implant placement,implant loading (0.5 year), and 1 and 1.5 years follow-up. The results based on28 patients who attended the follow-up visit (half had flapless and half a flapprotocol) showed a 100% implant survival rate and a 96.4% implant success rate8.5 years after implant placement using one-piece implants, with no differencein survival and success rates between the flapless and the flap protocol.During the same follow-up period, a significant increase in crestal bone heightfrom 1.5 to 8.5 years was observed. Analysis suggested decreasing mean levelsof bone loss with time (P < .001). Moreover, there was 0.8 to 1.0 mm of boneloss through year 1.5, which decreased to 0.3 mm at 8.5 years (P < .05).There was no statistically significant difference in PPD or BOP over time.Similar mean levels of PPD were found in flap and flapless groups (mean [SD] =2.4 [0.3] and 2.2 [0.4] mm, respectively [P = .18]), as well as similar ratesof BOP (22.8% vs 17.9%, respectively). Papilla levels increased during thefirst year after implant loading. However, there was little additional changebetween 1.5 and 8.5 years. A total of eight fractured porcelain crowns andthree crown loosenings were reported. One-piece implants with an AOS showedhigh survival rates and stable marginal bone and periimplant soft tissue levelsregardless of whether a flapless or flap protocol was used.