Archives

VOLUME 2 NO. 1 , 2018

OTHER ONLINE ARTICLES

Factors affecting the decision to use cemented or screw-retained fixed implant-supported prostheses: A critical review
Gómez-Polo M / Ortega R / Gómez-Polo C / Celemin A / Del Rio Highsmith J.

Factors affecting the decision to use cemented or screw-retained fixed implant-supported prostheses: A critical review

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Purpose: Thisreview aimed to compile and enumerate all the factors described in theliterature that may affect the decision to use either cemented orscrew-retained restorations and to determine the relative weights of eachfactor by type of retention and prosthesis. Materials and methods: The literature was reviewed, and the factorswere classified as either determining (present in a clinical situation in whichone of the retention mechanisms was clearly more suitable than the other) orconditioning (present in clinical situations in which one type of restorationwas not clearly more advantageous than the other). Results: Three determining factors (esthetic outcome, retention,and biologic risk) and five conditioning factors (passive fit, fracturestrength, occlusal area, complications, and retrievability) were identified. Conclusion: Although there is not aclearly better alternative for all clinical situations, determining factors incertain scenarios can render one of the two approaches more recommendable. Foresthetic reasons, when the implant angle cannot be corrected to conceal theaccess hole, cementation is more suitable; however, screw retention is thebetter option when the occlusal space is under 6 mm or margins cannot belocated supra- or equigingivally. In the absence of determining factors, thedecision should be based on conditioning factors, which carry different weightsdepending on the type of prosthesis.

Int J Prosthodont.2018 January/February;31(1):43–54.


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Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles
Porporatti AL, Bonjardim LR, Stuginski-Barbosa J, Bonfante EA, Costa YM, Rodrigues Conti PC.

Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles

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Aims: To address the two following questions: (1) What kindof somatosensory abnormalities may be characterized in patients receivingdental implants (IMP), in ongoing inflammatory dental pulpitis (IP) patients,and in neuropathic pain (atypical odontalgia [AO]) patients? and (2) What sortof sensory and neural changes may result from dental implant placement surgeryand pulpectomy? Methods: A total of 60 subjects were divided into three groups:the IMP (n = 20), IP (n = 20), and AO groups (n = 20). Quantitative sensorytesting (QST) was performed preoperatively (baseline) for all three groups andpostoperatively at 1 month and 3 months after dental implant placement orpulpectomy (in the IMP group and IP group, respectively). Statistical analyseswere completed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance and z scoretransformations (a = 5%). Results: The main findings of this study indicatedthat: (1) Elevations in mechanical detection threshold (MDT) and in currentperception threshold (CPT) related to C-fiber activation, indicating a loss offunction, were found at baseline in IP patients; (2) Somatosensory abnormalitiessuch as allodynia, reduced MDT and mechanical pain threshold (MPT), andimpaired pain modulation were found in AO patients; (3) No somatosensoryalterations after implant placement were found in the IMP group; and (4)Somatosensory alterations in the form of reduction in the CPT related toC-fiber activation were reported 3 months after pulpectomy in the IP group.Conclusion: This study showed that somatosensory abnormalities were evident inAO and IP patients, and somatosensory alterations were seen in IP patients even3 months after pulpectomy. However, no somatosensory alterations were seenafter implant placement.


Connective tissue graft and crown-resin composite restoration for the treatment of gingival recession associated with noncarious cervical lesions: Case series
Silveira CA / Mathias IF / da Silva Neves FL / Castro Dos Santos NC / Araújo CF / Neves Jardini MA /

Connective tissue graft and crown-resin composite restoration for the treatment of gingival recession associated with noncarious cervical lesions: Case series

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The purpose of this case series is to describe a restorativeand surgical approach to treat the combined defect (CD)-gingival recessionassociated with noncarious cervical lesions (NCCL)-through connective tissuegraft in combination with partial resin composite filling, restoring the crownzone plus 1 mm of the NCCL. A total of 10 patients were included. Bleeding onprobing, probing depth, relative gingival recession, clinical attachment level,CD height, and dentin hypersensitivity were measured. The treatment providedstatistically significant gain in clinical attachment level and shallow probingdepths. The percentage of the combined defect coverage was 70% ± 20.2%. It canbe concluded that this treatment protocol, in the presence of a partial resincomposite restoration, can be used successfully to treat CD.

Int J PeriodonticsRestorative Dent. 2017 Jul/Aug;37(4):601-607.