Archives

VOLUME 2 NO. 4 , 2018

OTHER ONLINE ARTICLES

Tuberosity versus palatal donor sites for soft tissue grafting: A split-mouth clinical study
Peter N. Amin / Nabil F. Bissada / Paul A. Ricchetti / Andre Paes B. Silva / Catherine A. Demko

Tuberosity versus palatal donor sites for soft tissue grafting: A split-mouth clinical study

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Objective: Tocompare postoperative pain associated with palatal and tuberosity donor sitesfor soft tissue grafting, and to evaluate the outcomes in both the donor andrecipient sites. Method and Materials:Twenty healthy nonsmokers requiring bilateral soft tissue grafts were recruitedfor the study. For the 10 patients who required free gingival graft (FGG), 10epithelialized grafts were taken from the tuberosity and 10 from the palate.The other 10 patients who required coronally advanced flap (CAF) and connectivetissue graft (CTG) received 10 de-epithelialized grafts from the tuberosity and10 from the palate. A total of 20 receded areas were treated with CAF and CTG.A total of 20 mucogingival defects were treated by FGG. Pain level was reportedby the patient using a subjective score on a scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10= very severe pain). The length, width, and thickness of the outcome wasmeasured for the FGG group at 8 weeks. The percentage of root coverage alongwith the length, width, and thickness of the final outcome was measured for theFGG group as well as the CAF and CTG group. Results: Pain level in the tuberosity donor site was significantlylower than in the palatal donor site during the first 2 postoperative weeks(2.6 ± 2.16 versus 5.9 ± 2.74 respectively, P < .001). Mean gingivalthickness of the healed tuberosity donor graft was greater than of the palataldonor grafts in both groups; for CAF and CTG group 2.9 ± 0.5 versus 2.3 ± 0.6mm, respectively (P = .016); for FGG group 2.7 ± 0.7 versus 2.1 ± 0.7,respectively (P = .026). No differences were observed in the length or width ofboth grafted sites at an 8-week follow-up. No significant difference in themean percentage of root coverage resulting from tuberosity or palatal donorsites was noted (67 ± 12% versus 62 ± 13%, respectively, P = .102). Conclusion: Soft tissue graftsharvested from the tuberosity site might provide a better option than softtissue donor grafts obtained from the palate in terms of function and lesspostoperative pain.


An acrylic immobilization bite block for use during radiation therapy: Description of a new technique
Caroline T. Nguyen / Vincent S. K. Lee / Jonn Wu

An acrylic immobilization bite block for use during radiation therapy: Description of a new technique

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Utilizing intraoral bite blocks can aid in stabilizing themandible during radiation treatment (RT) and minimizing side effects to healthytissues. This report describes a technique to fabricate a customized acrylicrepositioning immobilization bite block that was integrated into the clinicalworkflow of radiation appointments with no delay in starting RT and withincreased patient comfort.


ONLINE FIRST

Immediate implant placement in single-tooth molar extraction sockets: A 1- to 6-year retrospective clinical study
Francesco Amato / Giorgio Polara

Immediate implant placement in single-tooth molar extraction sockets: A 1- to 6-year retrospective clinical study

The aim of this study was to investigate the survival rateof implants immediately placed in fresh extraction sockets of molars in themaxilla and mandible with a single-stage procedure. A total of 102 patientswere treated, and 107 implants (53 in the maxilla and 54 in the mandible) wereplaced in a fresh molar extraction socket and connected to a healing abutment.After a mean follow-up of 3 years (range: 1 to 6 years) 1 implant failed, for acumulative success rate of 99.06% (98.11% for the mandible and 100% for themaxilla). The results of this study support placement of an implant immediatelyafter the extraction of a molar, applying a single-stage procedure.