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VOLUME 1 NO. 1 , 2017

Events

The 70th Indian Dental Conference 2017, Mumbai

The 70th Indian Dental Conference 2017, Mumbai

Events

The 70th Indian Dental Conference (IDC), the annual event of the dental fraternity in India hosted by the IDA Maharashtra State Branch was held at the expansive CIDCO Exhibition Centre, Vashi, Navi Mumbai. The event was spearheaded by Dr. Sanjay Bhavsar with proficient support of the august organizing committee...
Basal Implantology or Conventional Implantlantology

Basal Implantology or Conventional Implantlantology

Events

A Dental Implant is the next best thing ever to our healthy natural teeth with respect to stability, longevity, feel, function and aesthetics.Now the Big Debate is - Can all these be achieved by Basal Implantology or Conventional Implantology or by both...

Product Review

3 Shape Trios Intraoral Scanner

3 Shape Trios Intraoral Scanner

Product

3 Shape Trios Intraoral Scanner is a milestone in the evolution of digital impression making. This Award-winning technology is an "All in One Solution" for taking impression and its processing...

OTHER ONLINE ARTICLES

Dental pigmentation and hemochromatosis: A case report
Mayra Schemel-Suárez, DDS/José López-López, MD, DDS, PhD/Eduardo Chimenos-Küstner, MD, DDS, PhD

Dental pigmentation and hemochromatosis: A case report

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The causes of dental pigmentation are diverse. It can be classified in intrinsic or extrinsic depending on the origin and location of the stain in the affected tooth. This report presents an unusual case of dental pigmentation and enamel loss where the diagnosis of its origin revealed an underlying systemic pathology, unknown to the patient, which could have affected the development of the pigmentation.

Key words: dental pigmentation, diagnosis, discoloration, hemochromatosis, iron overload, tooth wear

Limitations and options using resorbable versus nonresorbable membranes for successful guided bone regeneration
Nikolaos K. Soldatos, DDS, MSD, PhD/Popi Stylianou, DDS, MS/Vasiliki P. Koidou, DDS/ Nikola Angelov,

Limitations and options using resorbable versus nonresorbable membranes for successful guided bone regeneration

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Objective: Deficient bony ridges often complicate the implant treatment plan. Several treatment modalities are used to regenerate bone, including guided bone regeneration (GBR). The purpose of this study was to summarize the knowledge on different types of membranes available and currently used in GBR procedures in a staged approach or with simultaneous implant placement. The primary role of the membranes is to exclude epithelial and connective tissue cells from the wound area to be regenerated, and to create and maintain the space into which pluripotential and osteogenic cells are free to migrate. 

Data Sources: A literature search was performed for articles that were published in English on the topic. A selected number of studies were chosen in order to provide a review of the main characteristics, applications, and outcomes of the different types of membranes. Resorbable membranes are made of natural or synthetic polymers like collagen and aliphatic polyesters. Collagens are the most common type used. They have similar collagen composition to the periodontal connective tissue. Other materials available include human, porcine, and bovine pericardium membranes, human amnion and chorion tissue, and human acellular freeze-dried dermal matrix. Nonresorbable membranes used in GBR include dense-polytetrafluoroethylene (d-PTFE), expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE), titanium mesh, and titanium-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene. 

Conclusions: The most common complication of nonresorbable membranes is exposure, which has detrimental effect on the final outcome with both types of membranes. For vertical bone augmentation procedures, the most appropriate membranes are the nonresorbable. For combination defects, both types result in a successful outcome. 


Key words: alveolar ridge augmentation, membranes, nonresorbable, resorbable


ONLINE FIRST

Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery
Danielle Clark, RDH, BSc/Maria Febbraio, PhD/Liran Levin, DMD

Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery

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Aggressive periodontal disease is an oral health mystery. Our current understanding of this disease is that specific bacteria invade the oral cavity and the host reacts with an inflammatory response leading to mass destruction of the alveolar bone. Aggressive periodontal disease is typically observed in a population under the age of 30 and occurs so rapidly that it is difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the consequence of this disease frequently involves tooth extractions. As a result, the aftermath is chewing disability and damage to self-esteem due to an altered self-image. Furthermore, patients are encumbered by frequent dental appointments which have an economic impact in regards to both personal financial strain and absent days in the workplace. Aggressive periodontal disease has a tremendous effect on patients' overall quality of life and needs to be investigated more extensively in order to develop methods for earlier definitive diagnosis and effective treatments. One of the mysteries of aggressive periodontal disease is the relatively nominal amount of plaque present on the tooth surface in relation to the large amount of bone loss. There seems to be a hidden factor that lies between the response by the patient's immune system and the bacterial threat that is present. A better mechanistic understanding of this disease is essential to provide meaningful care and better outcomes for patients.